top of page

US Native Wildflower, Chamaecrista Fasciculata, Cassia

50 seeds

 

I love the yellow blooms on these, they remind me of cassia and I was excited to find out that they’re also referred to as cassia Fasciculata in addition to their official botanical name of Chamaecrista Fasciculata.

It is an annual that is said by many sources to grow in zones 3-9, but according to several Florida sources, including the Florida native wildflower foundation, it’s native range extends all the way down to the southernmost tip of Florida and is reported to grow in zones 3-10B. that’s quite the range for this tough little member of the legume family! I can vouch that it grows naturally here in zone 10A.

Being in the legume family, it is a nitrogen fixer which means it extracts nitrogen from the air and returns it to the soil, making the soil richer than before it was planted!

It blooms from all spring and summer long and produces seed pods in the fall where it readily reseeds the following spring.

it is a bee and butterfly magnet, serving as a larval host Larval host for the cloudless sulfur, gray hairstreak, orange sulphur, sleepy orange, little yellow and ceraunus blue butterflies. if you’re a butterfly enthusiast or just looking to help with conservation, this is a plant you want.

It also attracts the following bees:

long-tongued bees, honey bees, leaf cutter bees, bumble bees and long horned bees. Preserving our native bee population is crucially important, honey bees, while not native are welcome, but native bees are what gather nectar from our native plants and are responsible for a massive portion of pollination.

It also attracts many species of birds that eat the seeds

The leaves respond to touch and close at night, so it is also sometimes referred to as sensitive plant, not to be confused with the mimosa genus.

It’s native range includes the following states:

New Mexico
Texas
Oklahoma
Kansas
Nebraska
South Dakota
Minnesota
Michigan
Ontario Canada
Missouri
Arkansas
Louisiana
Illinois
Iowa
Indiana
Kentucky
Tennessee
Mississippi
Alabama
Georgia
Florida
North and South Carolina
Virginia
West Virginia
Ohio
Pennsylvania
New York
New Jersey
Connecticut
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Delaware
Maryland
Maine

Annual

Grows 2 feet tall

The seeds can be sown in fall for a spring emergence although they only require a short, 10 day period or cold if seeds are scarified first. if planting in fall, do not scarify the seeds.

For artificial cold stratification, rub the seeds between two sheets of medium grit sandpaper, then fold the seeds into a moist paper towel and then place in a sealed ziploc and put them in your refrigerator for 10 days. then sow as normal.

This is for 50 seeds

Partridge Pea Seeds

SKU: CA6150
$1.99Price

    Related Products